Saturday, 23 July 2022

Boy oh boy! Wouldn't wish this on ANYbody!

 

My first ever surgical operation - and. oh the pain - during it!!!! 

In short (?), then - I reported as requested to Brighton eye hospital for their team to examine the botched cataract removal surgery, my 'other' eye having been done with no problem at all - and within just 10 minutes when I'd felt very little discomfort. Now the team of specialists were alarmed at the build up of pressure inside the faulty eye, now with no lens, and I was strongly recommended an operation without further delay. Any postponement, they said, would carry a grave risk of losing all sight in that eye. So no choice, really. It had never occurred to me that things would have to move so fast. 

That was last Wed. They scheduled the operation for the following morning, asking me to stay overnight so it could be done right away at 7 a.m. I told them "No way!" ( I had to return home to see to the pussycats - which I didn't tell them. Besides, I've never been to hospital to stay in my entire life!) So early on Thurs morning I journeyed back with more than a little apprehension. 

Pre-surgery was given several different tablets and eye-drops to, the theory was, deaden any pain - on top of which received an injected local anaesthetic for the eye and its surroundings. Right from the start, when one of the two main surgeons started poking into the eye the pain was simply excruciating, the like of which I don't recall having experienced before. I tried my best not to yell out, failing a number of times,  and so it went on and on for very nearly an hour! I was gripping onto the edge of the operating table like my life depended on it - and each time I shouted out a soothing voice would say "Don't worry, Sir. Just a couple more things to do." The number of times I was told this was unbelievable - "Don't worry, Sir. Just a couple more things, then we've finished". It went on and on until I really thought my heart was going to give up the ghost.

Eventually it really did end and I was able to sit up, very sore-eyed, to be wheeled to where I could relax(!) for a couple of hours. At last I was able - just - to struggle up onto my unsteady pins. Then after a cursory examination, my 'new' eye (with new lens inserted) covered by cotton wool and shield, I made my wobbly way back home on the bus.

Woke up yesterday morning after sleeping a full 14 hours, though disturbed during night by soreness in and around the eye. Then at last I could venture to remove the shield. I did have some vision there, for the first time in several months, though was disappointed by it being nowhere near as sharp as the 'good' eye - and I even now as yet can't read with it, either distance and close-up.

Had to return to the hospital the next day yet again for a routine post-operation check-up. Both doctors I saw were very pleased at how things were, the pressure inside the eye having gone back down to near-normal. I was assured that once the lens has settled I will be able to read with it, which is the blessing I was hoping for. So I go back again for one further check-up in 3 weeks time.

That's the saga as currently is. I was immensely relieved to be told that no further surgery will be necessary, which is just as well, as I'd do just about anything to avoid going through that again - above all, if it's to be subject again to the sheer agony of that hour 'under the knife'!


Now the morning following what I posted above:-

After a night's reflection, and having now regained some composure after that horrific experience, I've come to the incredible, but not totally improbable, conclusion that, by some oversight (not intentionally, one assumes - and I hope) I was not administered with any anaesthetic, general or local. When I was told about the surgery the previous day I clearly recall the doctor saying that I'd be given a local anaesthetic. However, come the day I do not remember my being given any injection prior to the operation or, indeed, after. If I'd made any assumption at all it had been that there must have been something in the several tablets I was being given which would do that service. What prevented me from crying out during the operation even more than I did was the notion that I would be thought a wimp! But can one actually anaesthetise by taking only oral medication? Surely it would require an actual injection by syringe into the relevant area, as when a dentist gives you a jab in the gums, then waits a couple of minutes or longer for it to take effect. There was none of that in my case here. 

So that is my conclusion, unpleasant as it is, but now maintain what is likely to have happened. It would explain so much. When I went for the following day's check-up I did mention what a horror-show experience it had been - but no comment was made by the main doctor who just smiled benignly. (Perhaps he now realised it himself but didn't want to pursue it, maybe understandably so?) I think when I return for a further examination in three weeks' time I will mention it again and ask directly if it could happen that a patient is operated on without being anaesthetised first, to which the answer has got to be "Yes". I'd hardly have been the first! If there really has to be a 'next time', can't any more assume that the staff have got it all right.

26 comments:

  1. Oh, I feel your pain sweetie! Something just isn't right about this whole experience. I hope you don't suffer any long-term trauma over this. Hugs.

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    1. Thanks, D. I've added further thoughts to the end of what I originally wrote above. It's an unpalatable conclusion but it seems to make more sense than having no explanation at all.

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  2. Were they aware of the pain during the surgery? I mean, were you able to tell them? That just shouldn’t BE. What hell. I’m glad it appears to have been successful. But you never should have had to experience that. My second cataract surgery (I didn’t have to go back for what you did) was more difficult than my first -- the lens was difficult to remove -- so took longer and was no longer as relaxed as I had been and I could feel some pressure, but no pain. Recovery was just a bit slower, too, but all went well. Wishing you a complete recovery!

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    1. Ta, Mitch. Yes they certainly knew from my regular loud yells of pain that something wasn't right, but as far as I could tell nothing was done about it. I've added to the end above two more paragraphs detailing what I think had happened, which in the cool light of three days later, now seems a reasonable conclusion.
      Glad that you were able to get through your on troublesome bit without the agonies I suffered.

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    2. I’m glad you’re at least doing well now. I can’t believe they continued the surgery with you yelling in pain. Also, the anesthesia would have included something to encourage memory loss of the trauma. Bottom line: You’re OK now. But, man!

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    3. It most definitely was a day to remember, Mitch, for all the wrong reasons. But can't do anything about it now. Eye and surrounding area is still more sore than I'd have liked, and I still can't read well out of that side, BUT I can sense some modicum of improvement so got to be thankful for that. Here's hoping for maintained improvement.

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  3. Sorry there was so much pain involved. That is not right. I am shocked, actually. Wishing you a speedy recovery and may everything work out as you hope. Take good care. Eat well and drink lots of water. Hydration helps healing! Kizzes.

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    1. My added final two paras above should now explain the most likely cause, U. At least it's over - for now, and if I must undergo further similar, next time I know what to make sure of.

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  4. Poor you, sounds horrific, hope all will be well with your eye soon.

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    1. Thanks ever so much, Chris. It's onwards and upwards now - I trust!

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  5. Oh, Ray. How inhumane. I can't believe they couldn't find something to numb you, anesthetize you, or put you under. How horrible. I hope your eyesight returns to normal, so at least you will not have gone through that for nothing.

    Sassybear
    https://idleeyesandadormy.com/

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    1. Hi S/b. I've just added two more paragraphs to the end of what I wrote yesterday, which at this stage to me makes the most sense for what had occurred. I think this was the truth of it, though not easy to accept of staff in whom one places an absolute trust.
      Grateful thanks for your generous thoughts.

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  6. Oh you poor man, that sounds awful - the stuff of nightmares. I do hope you have a speedy and successful recuperation. Regards. Sally

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    1. Thanks a million, Sally. A very likely explanation I've now added to the end of what I posted yesterday. The realisation has helped me to accept it a bit more - but ONLY a bit.

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  7. Jennifer Barlow23 July 2022 at 20:01

    That's awful. I'm so sorry. That shouldn't have happened!

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    1. I know, Jennifer, but it happened - and I've now added above the, for me, most likely cause if it. I don't EVER want to go through that again - likewise anybody else too. Thanks for calling by.

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  8. Glad it's over. Here's to a quick recovery!

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    1. Yup, here's hoping, Walt. May all the pain turn out to have been worthwhile. Thanks for the call.

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  9. What an absolutely horrendous experience. My husband has age related macular degeneration of the eyes and has to have a monthly injection to the worse eye to keep it stable. They paint a dot above the eye to make sure they get the right one then ask him to be still while they inject the corner of the eye. Had you had the anaesthetic it would surely have been done this way and you would have been very aware of it. I am horrified at such negligence. I hope your sight improves to the extent that you can get past this horror. I so feel for you. Wishing you complete recovery and better sight soon. Hugs.

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    1. Thank you ever so much, Carol. Like your husband (but with nothing even approaching his most worrying condition) before my operation they did also put a dot over my right eye but that was only for them to make sure they worked on the correct one.
      I hoping the improvement, such as it is, speeds up now but I'm very aware of how much more fortunate I am than many others with far more serious conditions.
      Very best wishes to you and to your hubby.

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  10. That sounds like a complete nightmare, Ray. Start to finish. And yes, I agree: I would definitely tell them about it. So someone knows something was messed up; there is no way that should have been performed w/out anesthesia of some sort. If only so the next person there doesn't experience the same thing.

    I can relate to not wanting to say overnight. I have a house full of pets, am on my own. You worry so much about things, don't you, that people w/partners just take for granted? I guess we'll just have to give ourselves credit for handling things all by ourselves. Stay well!!

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    1. Thanks greatly for your thoughts, Elle. Yes, despite concerns for myself, near or at the top of the list of my worries during the 'procedure' was would the cats be okay for up to ten hours without me, something I don't think they've experienced before. And would you believe it, when I finally got through my door following the grisly ordeal, did they come to greet me? You can guess. One did raise his head to see who had come in, yawned, then returned back to sleep.
      Of course I'll never forget what happened but simply must at least attempt to put it firmly behind me. Thanks for your visit - and best wished to yu.

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  11. I am always glad to see so much love and support here in the comments. I too am glad it is over. Heal well.

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  12. Thanks you, Sir. Reading all the supportive comments gives me a much-needed lift at a time when any at all is welcome. I never cease to feel grateful, especially when thinking how 'lucky' I am when compared to others, often much younger than meself..

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  13. The lack of consideration in the treatment given to you is simply appalling. I do wish you had a good advocate that could go with you to these appointments. I'm glad your pain is lessening and your sight is returning. Hugs and best wishes for a complete recovery.

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    1. I go for a progress-check this coming Wed, AKC. Must say that sight in this latter eye is nowhere near as good as that in the first eye done, though if I didn't have the comparison I might have been more satisfied with what I've now got. I'm going to need spectacles to be able to read with the latest operated-on eye - but of course it's far better now than what it was like before I had that dreadful surgery. Still feels like I've got a foreign body in that eye too, but we're always at the mercy of those whom we must presume to be expert.

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