Wednesday, 5 August 2015

Film: 'Mission Impossible - Rogue Nation'.

There's been a dearth of films worth stirring oneself for lately but this major release always held the promise of superficial thrills in the manner of previous in the series. And this it delivers - brash, noisy, almost unintelligible plot (but does it matter? Not really) - and, dammit, it's pretty exciting. One of those 'leave-your-brains-at-the-door' films, and no worse for that.

Cultist Tom Cruise does his Superman act as FBI agent Ethan Hunt again, aided by miniaturised computer gadgetry and aps galore (not to mention his own physical prowess and skills), assisted by the welcome, uplifting presence of Simon Pegg as his MI6 partner. Then there's Rebecca Ferguson (whose first major screen role this appears to be) - as an enigmatic side-shifting agent (or is she?) with all of Hunt's skills and sharing his ludicously unerring firearm accuracy in which, unlike their opponents, they score a bullseye with every shot. Hunt and Pegg are trying to find out who is at the root of a nefarious international organisation called 'The Syndicate', bent on hijacking the world's finances for their own dastardly ends. In addition there's Alec Baldwin and Jeremy Renner as FBI big-wigs, never quite sure of how far to trust Hunt, and both practically soiling their pants in the process, especially the former. Another 'biggish' name is Ving Rhames who, if he gets any broader, will soon be a human walking rectangle!

Most of the film takes place in London (that's England, we're informed), with a very short early sequence in Havana (Cuba!) and more substantial episodes in Casablanca (Morocco - including an extended car chase through the narrow streets and alleys in broad daylight, with not a soul about!) and Vienna (yes, that's right, the Vienna in Austria). The latter is a very entertaining section at the opera (where I've actually been) during a performance of Puccini's 'Turandot', the music cut and pasted about, but crucially including, what else, but 'Nessun Dorma'. Aficianados of Alfred Hitchcock films will note the resemblance of this scene to the climactic Royal Albert Hall scene in 'The Man Who Knew Too Much'.
As required, the London scenes had to include a number of the usual touristy backdrops. I thought the inclusion of the Tower of London was an interesting and unusual move but, sadly, the location wasn't exploited at all.

The film's director (and writer) was Christopher McQuarrie, probably best known for his screenplay for 'The Usual Suspects'. He does what one would expect here, without blazing any trails.

The film passed a Summer's afternoon pleasantly enough, and if you like this sort of mindless, forgettable stuff it'll be right up your street. Importantly, I don't regret the expense and time I invested....................6.

19 comments:

  1. Frothy crap
    We all need it from time to time eh?

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    1. I understand, Bob. However, though it pains me to say it, it is rather enjoyable.

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  3. I'm not sure how Tom Cruise went from being good to being annoying but that he now is. Perhaps something to do with him becoming a caricature of himself? The film sounds decent enough though.

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    1. And doing all his own stunts, Craig, of which there are quite a number here. I know that some can't simply ignore his presence with all the 'baggage' that he brings along, but I managed to put it aside, as others will.

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    2. That is indeed impressive Ray. I note in the news this morning that the Scientology film you reviewed so well is cleared to air unedited on Sky Atlantic in a few weeks. I shall look forward to it!

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    3. Yes, I saw that as well, Craig. At the very least it should be a salutary lesson for the CULT that despite all its bullying tactics and threats it doesn't always get its own way. And the amount of heat this issue has generated has practically guaranteed that it'll have a considerably larger audience than it otherwise might have done. (Tee hee!) I hope you get to write about what you thought about it somewhere.

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  4. I do not see movies of Mr. Cruise, for he says mean things about me.

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    1. You've made similar comments in the past, Dr Spo, and I can appreciate your boycott of T.C.'s films. But if the whisperings are to be believed it could be that in time we'll see him with a change of heart - though it could be that the rumours are merely wishful thinking. Let's wait and see.

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    2. Until then, no Mr. Cruise (said in my best Joan Crawford voice about wire hangers).

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    3. We shall jointly await the day, then. Get the bunting ready and the fireworks at hand and let's hope it's not too long a wait.

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  5. Ray,
    Pat absolutely LOVED this film! I promised him I would see it with him when I visit Toronto later this month. I'll ask him to read your splendid review.
    Ron

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    1. Ron, without a word of a lie, as I was watching it I thought that this would be the kind of film that would suit your Pat down to the ground. Promise. I'm not in the least surprised at what you say. I'm pretty sure you'd like it too. Popcorn fodder? Absolutely, but that doesn't mean it isn't enjoyable. So you can go without fearing the worst. I allow you to!

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  6. Saw some billboards of this movie, planned blockbuster. :)

    However... Never have I ever been into Tom Cruise. So, I'll pass. I really can't stand him. By reading other comments, seems like I'm not the only one!

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    1. True, you're by no means alone on Mr C., F.T. - in fact you may be in the majority. But if his presence gets in the way of enjoying a film, why bother indeed?

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  7. I'll pass on Mr. Cruise. Thanks for the insight and world tour. ;-)

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    1. You're welcome, F.B. But it's always useful to have a geography lesson thrown in for free in such films. Good heavens!. Where would we be if we hadn't known in which countries these cities are located? Well, we wouldn't know where we were, would we?

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